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The magic behind Valentino

Pierpaolo Piccolo's vision for Valentino is making waves around the fashion world, full of romanticism and with the International Designer of the Year at the helm, the future of this fashion house shines bright. #valentino #fashion #pierpaolopiccioli #designeroftheyear

Talk about inspiration, when you look at what Pierpaolo Piccioli has done for the fashion house of Valentino, after Maria Grazia Chiuri left to join Dior, is impeccable! The two of them, both Italian natives, joined Valentino in 1999 to work on shoes and accessories under the brand's founder Valentino Garavani. After his retirement in 2008, the pair were appointed as creative co-directors. The brand profits were on the rise shortly after, as they introduced the commercially popular Rockstud shoe! Piccioli was then made the sole creative director in 2016.


In an industry driven by sales figures, Piccioli's designs create an immensely visually pleasing spectacle - I mean he stole the headlines when he presented his Autumn/Winter 2018 couture show last summer and sent Kaia Gerber down the runway (above) wearing a giant confection of pastel pink feathers paired with bouffant hair. What a sight indeed!


Although my personal favourite was the Spring/Summer 2019 ready-to-wear collection. It was absolutely beautiful and I loved its simplicity. Every look seemed wearable. One could see the attention to detail you would expect from a haute couture piece, but presented in a read-to-wear fashion. Have a look below.

On another note, Valentino just opened a pop-up store in Ginza, Tokyo, selling everything from womenswear, menswear and accessories, while concentrating on limited edition collaborations with Japanese brands such as Undercover.

"Japan has always fascinated me, because it has a different kind of beauty." Pierpaolo Piccioli

Piccioli goes on to explain, how the western idea of beauty comes from a Greek tradition of perfection, while Japan treasures the imperfection. This can be seen by their technique, kintsugi, where cracks in pottery are repaired with a gold lacquer, highlighting the value of its faults. This is very interesting, as it suggests that time adds something precious to beauty, which sounds very romantic.

Also worth checking out is Pierpaolo Piccioli's collection for Moncler, full of whimsy and cheerful colours.

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